7 Last Mile Solutions That Dont Look Unacceptably Stupid

Before the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 came along and swiped its crown, the poster child for unintended electronic fires was the hoverboard. Perhaps the most mocked transport solution, ever. They looked dumb, annoyed pedestrians, and they didn’t even hover—they just rolled around on wheels. It’s a shame, because no matter the doofiness, that kind of compact, speedy, low effort transport can be great for getting you that “last mile” from your office to the metro, or from the bus stop to your house. As cities work to get citizens out of cars, anything that makes getting around via public transit is a valuable tool. If you’re willing to give it a shot, here are our choices for the best, last mile solutions.

Forget hovering.

Hoverboards really had potential as last mile solutions. They were small and light enough to carry into your apartment or office to charge, and relatively unobtrusive on the sidewalk. They might even make a comeback, now regulations are reining things in. But in the meantime, a electric skateboard does the same thing, and could possibly make you look cool (maybe). Try the $1,400 Inboard M1 for an effortless ride. It’s capable of 24 mph, so you might also want some knee and elbow pads if you haven’t been on a board since your misspent youth.

Credit: inboard

Hoverboards really had potential as last mile solutions. They were small and light enough to carry into your apartment or office to charge, and relatively unobtrusive on the sidewalk. They might even make a comeback, now regulations are reining things in. But in the meantime, a electric skateboard does the same thing, and could possibly make you look cool (maybe). Try the $1,400 Inboard M1 for an effortless ride. It’s capable of 24 mph, so you might also want some knee and elbow pads if you haven’t been on a board since your misspent youth.

Remember Segway?

The Segway was supposed to be the ultimate city transport, but now it’s reserved for helmet-clad tourists seeing the sights. It’s expensive, dorky, and obtrusive. It didn’t help that the company’s owner died after driving one off a cliff. Now the company has a new offering, the MiniPro, and in our extensive testing around the office and San Francisco, we found it was actually kinda cool. Steering with your knees takes some getting used to, but there are safety mechanisms to stop you faceplanting at the train station.

Credit: Segway

The Segway was supposed to be the ultimate city transport, but now it’s reserved for helmet-clad tourists seeing the sights. It’s expensive, dorky, and obtrusive. It didn’t help that the company’s owner died after driving one off a cliff. Now the company has a new offering, the MiniPro, and in our extensive testing around the office and San Francisco, we found it was actually kinda cool. Steering with your knees takes some getting used to, but there are safety mechanisms to stop you faceplanting at the train station.

Small cars are better in cities.

If you’re really can’t face the idea of going car-free, at least go small. Tiny cars take up less road space, and are easier to park. The adorably funky electric Renault Twizy seats two (barely) and will make you the most interesting thing on the street. (The only way to try one on this side of the pond is through the scooter sharing scheme Scoot, in San Francisco). Even cuter is the re-worked BMW Isetta, now the Microlino, which promises you more looks than a in a Ferrari, but which you can squeeze into the smallest spot at the curb.

Credit: Microlino

If you’re really can’t face the idea of going car-free, at least go small. Tiny cars take up less road space, and are easier to park. The adorably funky electric Renault Twizy seats two (barely) and will make you the most interesting thing on the street. (The only way to try one on this side of the pond is through the scooter sharing scheme Scoot, in San Francisco). Even cuter is the re-worked BMW Isetta, now the Microlino, which promises you more looks than a in a Ferrari, but which you can squeeze into the smallest spot at the curb.

Get pedaling.

You could go old-school, and just cycle. Sometransit agencies allow bikeson trains, so you can cycle to and from the station at both ends of your journey. If not, you’ll have to risk leaving it locked up at the station, and potentially finding it gone when you get back, so something that’s not too flashy is key. Our pick is the Priority Continuum, with a drive belt instead of chain (no more messed up trousers) and a clever infinitely adjustable gear mechanism to make easy work of hills.
 

Credit: Priority Bicycles

You could go old-school, and just cycle. Sometransit agencies allow bikeson trains, so you can cycle to and from the station at both ends of your journey. If not, you’ll have to risk leaving it locked up at the station, and potentially finding it gone when you get back, so something that’s not too flashy is key. Our pick is the Priority Continuum, with a drive belt instead of chain (no more messed up trousers) and a clever infinitely adjustable gear mechanism to make easy work of hills.
 

Fold up your bike!

If you don’t have room to store your bike at home or at work, then join legions of Londoners and take to your folding bicycle. The tube is packed with commuters balancing their feet around their cleverly compacted Bromptons. When they get off, they unfold the wheels and handlebars, origami upthe saddle, and pedal off. It’s elegant and effective city transport.

Credit: Brompton

If you don’t have room to store your bike at home or at work, then join legions of Londoners and take to your folding bicycle. The tube is packed with commuters balancing their feet around their cleverly compacted Bromptons. When they get off, they unfold the wheels and handlebars, origami upthe saddle, and pedal off. It’s elegant and effective city transport.

Monkey up your bike?

No to a folding bike? Maybe add some electric oomph, and … personality, with a Motochimp. It’s either the cutest, or ugliest, last mile solution we’ve seen. “Sassy yet classy,” claims the company. The Motochimp doesn’t take itself too seriously, so perhaps you’ll make your fellow commuters smile as you tap your RFID key, swing a lever over, and zoom off. With a range of 25 miles and a recharge time of just an hour, the Motochimp should cover most commutes with ease, if not style.
 

Credit: Motochimp

No to a folding bike? Maybe add some electric oomph, and … personality, with a Motochimp. It’s either the cutest, or ugliest, last mile solution we’ve seen. “Sassy yet classy,” claims the company. The Motochimp doesn’t take itself too seriously, so perhaps you’ll make your fellow commuters smile as you tap your RFID key, swing a lever over, and zoom off. With a range of 25 miles and a recharge time of just an hour, the Motochimp should cover most commutes with ease, if not style.
 

Remember your feet.

Looking for the ultimate in no-fuss, low cost, last mile solutions? Get yourself a comfortable pair of shoes and walk. Swap them at the office if youneed to dress up, or go for a pair of winterized sneakers on dress-down Friday. And treat yourself to that extra donut, you’ve earned it! Reduce your carbon footprintand your waist size, too.

Credit: Nike

Looking for the ultimate in no-fuss, low cost, last mile solutions? Get yourself a comfortable pair of shoes and walk. Swap them at the office if youneed to dress up, or go for a pair of winterized sneakers on dress-down Friday. And treat yourself to that extra donut, you’ve earned it! Reduce your carbon footprintand your waist size, too.

Read more: https://www.wired.com/2016/12/7-last-mile-solutions-dont-look-unacceptably-stupid/